Feeling tired? Here are 6 tips for a better night’s sleep

Do you find that you wake up feeling exhausted or groggy? Do you experience sleepless nights, even when going to bed early? According to some recent studies, the answer to this problem might be the myriad of devices we have lying around the bedroom.

During the two-week inpatient study, twelve participants read LE-e-Books on an iPad for four hours before bedtime each night for five consecutive nights. This was repeated with printed books. The order was randomized with some reading the iPad first and others reading the printed book first.

Participants reading on the iPad took longer to fall asleep, were less sleepy in the evening, and spent less time in REM sleep. Participants who read from the iPad were less sleepy before bedtime, but sleepier and less alert the following morning after eight hours of sleep.

EurekAlert

Although iPads were used in this study, the researchers also measured other eReaders, laptops, cell phones, LED monitors, and other electronic devices, all emitting blue light. These studies suggested that the closer to bedtime you use your phone or tablet, the harder it is to get a good night’s sleep.

So what can you do about it? Here are 6 tips to help you get a better night’s sleep.

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Read paper books instead of digital books

We know that reading books for pleasure can have a positive effect on your wellbeing, and we don’t want to squash that, but before bed try sticking to paper books rather than reading from an iPad or other light emitting device. Keep in mind that we’re talking about light emitting devices such as iPads, Galaxy Notes, etc. E-ink devices like the Amazon Kindle don’t emit light and are not as much of a problem.

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Turn your bedroom into a technology-free zone

Find the temptation to check the time or skim Facebook too great when your phone is right next to your bed? Make your bedroom a technology free zone. Get yourself an old school alarm clock and leave the devices on the dining table.

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Take a late night break from email and social media

Staying connected to the outside world by checking work emails or Facebook can actually stop you from relaxing and stress you out more. Psychologists suggest that time away from the internet can be a great way to decompress if you feel you need it.

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Working late? Remove the blue tint from your laptop

If you do find that you feel the need to keep working on your laptop, try using software that changes the tint of your screen to remove that harsh blue glow. For years I have used a program called f.lux that automatically transitions the tint of my screen as day turns to night.

During the day, computer screens look good—they’re designed to look like the sun. But, at 9PM, 10PM, or 3AM, you probably shouldn’t be looking at the sun.
justgetflux.com

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Disconnect yourself 30-60 minutes before bed

Avoid using any of the devices that emit blue light, such as iPads, mobile phones, laptops, etc for a set period before you try to sleep.

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Establish a routine and stick to it

Establishing a set night time routine can help to train your body to recognise when it is time to go to sleep.

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Dim the lights as the night gets later

Bright lighting in your house also alerts your body. Use dimmers if you have them, or turn off brighter lights a while before going to bed. Dimming your lights will also help make you more comfortable dimming your screen.

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These are our tips for a better night’s sleep away from those pesky devices. Do you have anything specific that works for you in shutting off and going to sleep? Let us know below.